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Seagate was quick to jump into the hybrid HDD/SSD fray last year, with the decently priced and capable Momentus XT. Now we have a successor with identical branding, but with the HDD upped to 742GB, NAND storage slightly increased to 8GB, plus a faster SATA III 6Gb/s interface. The ‘flash-assisted drive’ promises to cut boot-up and lag times compared to a standard laptop hard disk, by gradually learning which of your files are popular enough to deserve a spot in that solid state VIP lounge. We’re looking at a price of $189, including a five-year warranty, and availability from today. Read on the full PR.

Continue reading Seagate outs second-gen Momentus XT: a 750GB hybrid laptop drive for $189

Seagate outs second-gen Momentus XT: a 750GB hybrid laptop drive for $189 originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 29 Nov 2011 00:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/11/29/seagate-outs-second-gen-momentus-xt-a-750gb-hybrid-laptop-drive/

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A new comparison chart from Verizon shows the Galaxy Nexus listed as having “No OEM Customization”, the question still remains: will Verizon employees explain why that’s a good thing? Verizon employees receive extensive training, so they undoubtedly understand the differences between stock and customized Android, but it is a very different thing to actually explain those differences to potential customers. ?Many of the features of the Galaxy Nexus are fairly easy to explain, including NFC and Android Beam, the 720p screen or the lack of capacitive buttons. OEM customization is a much more convoluted idea that many people don’t fully understand, and many potential consumers may not care to understand. We’re hoping that Verizon employees will explain the benefits and drawbacks (yes, there are drawbacks) of stock Android properly, because all consumers should be able to make informed decisions.?

Benefits

The benefits side is relatively easy to explain though it could become a lengthy discussion about faster updates, all features being open and available, performance boosts over customized phones, and easy root/unlock options. Faster OS updates not only mean getting the newest major version of the OS when it is released, but also in getting all bug fixes and minor feature updates as fast as Google can push them. Although, there is a chance that those updates will see a delay for Verizon testing now, they will still be released far faster for Nexus owners than anyone else.?

Having all features of Android open and available for use has traditionally been by far one of the best reasons to go with a Nexus device, but we’re not sure that it fits here. In strict terms, we would assume that a device with “no OEM customization” means that no features have been turned off. The trouble is that we’re not sure if the main target here – free tethering/WiFi hotspot – is still a part of stock Android. As we’ve mentioned before, Google did remove free tethering/hotspot from Nexus S devices with one of the incremental updates, so there is a fair chance that it isn’t part of stock Android any more. Still, knowing that no other features will be removed is a benefit to stock.?

Custom UIs take up system resources, some far more than others (HTC Sense). With the power of today’s smartphones, this may not translate to a big difference in performance, but there will be a difference. Especially moving forward, because the resource requirements for custom UIs tends to grow faster than the resource requirements for stock Android.?

The last benefit may not be one that many customers will care about, and if they do care, it’s likely they wouldn’t need the explanation of benefits/drawbacks to stock Android, but easy root access and device unlocking can be quite useful. As nice as stock Android may be, a lot of people prefer custom ROMs, which can add features to stock Android without sacrificing performance. Verizon Nexus owners may not have much reason to unlock because it’s not as if they could swap in a new SIM card for a different carrier, but root access can be nice. Still, this is definitely not something Verizon employees would bother explaining anyway, because rooting/unlocking breaks your warranty.

Drawbacks

The drawbacks mostly fall under one major heading: do it yourself. With many OEM UIs, a lot of the things you may want are already there on screen, and you don’t even need to drill into app folders or widgets lists too much to put what you want on your homescreens. For those who love the customization options of Android, this is a benefit of stock; it is a clean palette to work with. However, many people are lazy and don’t want to do that. And, beyond having some customization done for you, some UIs, like HTC Sense, offer a number of extra features, like flipping the phone onto its screen to turn off the ringer, that users would only be able to get by installing 3rd party apps. Again, maybe you don’t want these features built-in, but many customers won’t go digging into the Android Market to replicate these features even if they want to have them.?

Another drawback of having stock Android is one that most don’t consider: having the newest version of Android isn’t always a good thing. Let’s face it, developers can be lazy, and some may not update their apps in a timely manner to support the new version of Android. We have seen it with every Android update, and we already know that it will be happening with Ice Cream Sandwich. When Gingerbread first launched, we had to switch to a new default keyboard, because one of our favorites, FlexT9, took months to update for Gingerbread support. Now, we already know that the Adobe Flash player has not yet been updated for ICS. Adobe has promised the update before the end of the year, but it still illustrates the issue. It may be a somewhat minor annoyance, because there are often alternatives for any app that hasn’t been updated for compatibility, but it is still an annoyance and something that will be a factor both in purchasing the Galaxy Nexus right now, and as a Nexus owner a year from now when Android Jelly Bean is released.?

Lastly, there is the general issue with being an early adopter: it can be a relatively lonely place. Granted, the Galaxy Nexus should sell far better than any previous Nexus device, but users still won’t have too much practical use for things like Android Beam or even video chat through Google Talk because the requisite hardware (NFC and front-facing cameras) and software (Android 4.0 and Android 2.3.4 respectively) haven’t been pushed out to all devices yet. If you do video chat with friends who are on PCs, that works fine, but unless your friends all have a Galaxy Nexus or Nexus S, Android Beam isn’t too useful right now. And, with projections putting NFC adoption at just 50% of handsets within 2-3 years, you may not see much use in it all that soon.?

Conclusion

It is very nice to finally have clean stock Android as a choice on Verizon, but there is just as much to consider when choosing stock Android as there is when choosing a device with a custom manufacturer UI. As always, it comes down to choice. Some want to have full control over every aspect of their device, and want to be able to start fresh and choose everything that is put on that device. Stock Android offers this.?

However, many people don’t want to have a clean slate when buying a new phone, and may want some of the customization and extra features added for them. Of course, there are drawbacks to this option in overall device performance and speed of OS updates, custom UIs take care of some of this work for you. Just because Android offers options for full customization doesn’t mean that all consumers want to exercise those options, and that’s where OEM customization can be a good thing for some users.?

Of course, the perfect option would be if all manufacturer UIs were made optional, and could be removed from devices. As far as we know, that may be the biggest unconfirmed benefit of Ice Cream Sandwich, and the new feature allowing users to remove any app could extend to manufacturer UIs, but we still need to see about that. Until that happens though, custom UIs fall under the realm of manufacturer differentiation, and consumer choice, and that includes the option for stock Android.?

Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/phonearena/ySoL/~3/Vi5E7cKv__M/Benefits-and-drawbacks-of-Galaxy-Nexus-having-No-OEM-Customization_id24117

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Givenchy 'Japan Limited' T-Shirt

Givenchy has certainly again made a strong name for itself ever since Riccardo Tisci took over, especially also with their strong graphic t-shirts. This week they have released an interesting dark bird graphic tee, exclusively for the Japanese market. The t-shirt comes in both white and black and is now in stock at Restir.


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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/highsnobiety/rss/~3/_wSsknKSACs/

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BEIJING ? The world should get ready for a new Made in China product ? vaccines.

China’s vaccine makers are gearing up over the next few years to push exports in a move that should lower costs of lifesaving immunizations for the world’s poor and provide major new competition for the big Western pharmaceutical companies.

However, it may take some time before some parts of the world are ready to embrace Chinese products when safety is as sensitive an issue as it is with vaccines ? especially given the food, drug and other scandals the country has seen.

Still, China’s entry into this market will be a “game changer,” said Nina Schwalbe, head of policy at the GAVI Alliance, which buys vaccines for 50 million children a year worldwide.

“We are really enthusiastic about the potential entry of Chinese vaccine manufacturers,” she said.

China’s vaccine-making prowess captured world attention in 2009 when one of its companies developed the first effective vaccine against swine flu ? in just 87 days ? as the new virus swept the globe. In the past, new vaccine developments had usually been won by the U.S. and Europe.

Then, this past March the World Health Organization announced that China’s drug safety authority meets international standards for vaccine regulation. It opened the doors for Chinese vaccines to be submitted for WHO approval so they can be bought by U.N. agencies and the GAVI Alliance.

“China is a vaccine-producing power” with more than 30 companies that have an annual production capacity of nearly 1 billion doses ? the largest in the world, the country’s State Food and Drug Administration told The Associated Press.

But more needs to be done to build confidence in Chinese vaccines overseas, said Helen Yang of Sinovac, the NASDAQ-listed Chinese biotech firm that rapidly developed the H1N1 swine flu vaccine. “We think the main obstacle is that we have the name of ‘made in China’ still. That is an issue.”

China’s food and drug safety record in recent years hardly inspires confidence: in 2007, Chinese cough syrup killed 93 people in Central America; one year later, contaminated blood thinner led to dozens of deaths in the United States while tainted milk powder poisoned hundreds of thousands of Chinese babies and killed six.

The government has since imposed more regulations, stricter inspections and heavier punishments for violators. Perhaps because of that, regulators routinely crack down on counterfeit and substandard drugmaking.

While welcoming WHO’s approval of China’s drug safety authority, one expert said it takes more than a regulatory agency to keep drugmakers from cutting corners or producing fakes.

“In the U.S., we have supporting institutions such as the market economy, democracy, media monitoring, civil society, as well as a well-developed business ethics code, but these are all still pretty much absent in China,” said Yanzhong Huang, a China health expert at the Council on Foreign Relations. “For China, the challenge is much greater in building a strong, robust regulative capacity.”

Last year, a Chinese newspaper report linked improperly stored vaccines to four children’s deaths in northern Shanxi province, raising nationwide concern. The Health Ministry said the vaccines did not cause the deaths, but some remained skeptical.

Meanwhile, Chinese researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine earlier this year that a pandemic flu vaccine given to 90 million people in 2009 was safe.

WHO’s medical officer for immunization, Dr. Yvan Hutin, said WHO’s approval of the Chinese drug regulatory agency is not “a blank check.” Each vaccine will be evaluated rigorously, with WHO and Chinese inspectors given access to vaccine plants on top of other safety checks, he said.

Vaccines have historically been a touchy subject in the Western world, rife with safety concerns and conspiracy theories. Worries about vaccine safety resurfaced in the late 1990s triggered by debate over a claimed association between the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella and autism. The claim was later discredited.

For China, the next few years will be crucial, as biotech companies upgrade their facilities and improve procedures to meet the safety and quality standards ? a process that is expected to be costly and challenging. Then they will submit vaccines to the U.N. health agency for approval, which could take a couple of years.

First up is likely to be a homegrown vaccine for Japanese encephalitis, a mosquito-borne disease that can cause seizures, paralysis and death. The vaccine has been used for two decades in China with fewer side effects than other versions. Its manufacturer expects WHO approval for it in about a year. Also in the works are vaccines for polio and diseases that are the top two killers of children ? pneumonia and rotavirus, which causes diarrhea.

Vaccines also are a significant part of a $300 million partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for the development of new health and farming products for poor countries.

China’s entry into this field is important because one child dies every 20 seconds from vaccine-preventable diseases each year. UNICEF, the children’s agency and the world’s biggest buyer of vaccines, has been in talks with Chinese companies, said its supply director Shanelle Hall. The fund provides vaccines to nearly 60 percent of the world’s children, and last year spent about $757 million.

Worldwide, vaccine sales last year grew 14 percent to $25.3 billion, according to healthcare market research firm Kalorama Information, as drugmakers which face intensifying competition from generic drugs now see vaccines as key areas of growth, particularly in Latin America, China and India.

China’s vaccine makers, some of whom already export in small amounts, are confident they will soon become big players in the field.

“I personally predict that in the next five to 10 years, China will become a very important vaccine manufacture base in the world,” said Wu Yonglin, vice president of the state-owned China National Biotec Group, the country’s largest biological products maker that has been producing China’s encephalitis vaccine since 1989.

CNBG will invest more than 10 billion yuan ($1.5 billion) between now and 2015 to improve its facilities and systems to meet WHO requirements, Wu said. The company also intends to submit vaccines to fight rotavirus, which kills half a million kids annually, and polio for WHO approval.

Smaller, private companies are also positioning themselves for the global market.

Sinovac is now testing a new vaccine for enterovirus 71, which causes severe hand, foot and mouth disease among children in China and other Asian countries. It is also preparing for clinical trials on a pneumococcal vaccine Yang says could rival Pfizer’s Prevnar, which was the top-selling vaccine worldwide last year with sales of about $3.7 billion.

Pneumococcal disease causes meningitis, pneumonia and ear infection.

“In the short term, everyone sees the exporting opportunities, because outside of China the entire vaccine market still seems to be monopolized by a few Big Pharma (companies),” Yang said.

The entry of Chinese companies is expected to further pressure Western pharmaceutical companies to lower prices. Earlier this year, UNICEF’s move to publicize what drugmakers charge it for vaccines showed that Western drugmakers often charged the agency double what companies in India and Indonesia do.

The aid group Doctors Without Borders criticized the vaccine body GAVI for spending hundreds of millions of dollars on anti-pneumonia vaccines from Western companies, saying it could put its buying power to even better use by fostering competition from emerging manufacturers like those in China.

GAVI’s Schwalbe said the vaccine body has to buy what is available and negotiates hard for steep discounts. “We need to buy vaccines now to save children’s lives now. We can’t wait.”

Source: http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/rss/china/*http%3A//news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20111129/ap_on_bi_ge/as_china_cheap_vaccines

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[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 28-Nov-2011
[ | E-mail | Share Share ]

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-2208
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

BOSTON, MABrigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) researchers have created a vaccine that is more potent than traditional vaccines available today. The glycoconjugate vaccine prototype is 100 times more effective than traditional glycoconjugate vaccines. Their work is published in the December 2011 issue of Nature Medicine.

A glycoconjugate vaccine is comprised of covalently bound carbohydrate and protein molecules, and is the standard design for many vaccines used to protect against common diseases such as pneumonia and meningitis.

Researchers designed the vaccine prototype after discovering that immune cells, called T-cells, can recognize a vaccine’s carbohydrates, and from that recognition elicit an immune response. This discovery challenges popular assumptions that immune cells only recognize the protein portion of glycoconjugate vaccines.

Proof that T-cells recognize carbohydrates came when researchers immunized mice with different types of glycoconjugate vaccines against the bacteria, group B Streptococcus. One group was immunized with vaccines containing different proteins. Another group was immunized with vaccines with the same proteins. For both groups, the carbohydrate chain in the vaccines was the same.

Researchers saw that mice given the vaccines with different proteins had just as good an immune response as those given vaccines with the same proteinsthe variability in proteins did not change immune response. This told researchers that T-cells were recognizing carbohydrates to generate a consistent immune response. They further investigated the mechanisms responsible for how carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugate vaccines activate protective immunity to a bacterial infection.

“One thing that is tremendously novel here is that we were able to find T-cells within a mouse after immunization with a glycoconjugate [vaccine] that just recognized carbohydrates,” said Dennis L. Kasper, MD, director of BWH’s Channing Laboratory. “So these may be the first true carbohydrate-specific T-cells found.”

The understanding that it was not only proteins, but also carbohydrates that were being recognized by cells led researchers to design a vaccine that yielded many carbohydrate particles when processed by the immune systemin turn creating a vaccine that generated a stronger immune response. Researchers believe that the more effective vaccine prototype they designed may one day assist in protecting high-risk populations susceptible of disease.

“For example, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are good in children, but are not effective in protecting the elderly,” explained Kasper. So we are hopeful that by designing vaccines like this, you’ll make better vaccines that will be effective in all the at-risk populations.”

Fikri Avci, PhD, lead study author and instructor in the Department of Medicine at BWH and Harvard Medical School adds that the findings on how the body’s immune cells interact with carbohydrates will also lead to more effective vaccines in the future.

“Carbohydrates are among the most abundant and structurally diverse molecules in nature,” said Avci. “They are extremely important in many biological functions. A better understanding of carbohydrate interaction is crucial. We are hoping that our findings will provide a framework for production of new-generation therapeutics and preventive medicines not only against bacterial infections, but also for cancer and viral diseases.”

###

The research was supported by grants from the United States National Institutes of Health.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is a 793-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners HealthCare, an integrated health care delivery network. BWH is the home of the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center, the most advanced center of its kind. BWH is committed to excellence in patient care with expertise in virtually every specialty of medicine and surgery. The BWH medical preeminence dates back to 1832, and today that rich history in clinical care is coupled with its national leadership in quality improvement and patient safety initiatives and its dedication to educating and training the next generation of health care professionals. Through investigation and discovery conducted at its Biomedical Research Institute (BRI), www.brighamandwomens.org/research, BWH is an international leader in basic, clinical and translational research on human diseases, involving more than 900 physician-investigators and renowned biomedical scientists and faculty supported by more than $537 M in funding. BWH is also home to major landmark epidemiologic population studies, including the Nurses’ and Physicians’ Health Studies and the Women’s Health Initiative. For more information about BWH, please visit www.brighamandwomens.org.



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?

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 28-Nov-2011
[ | E-mail | Share Share ]

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-2208
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

BOSTON, MABrigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) researchers have created a vaccine that is more potent than traditional vaccines available today. The glycoconjugate vaccine prototype is 100 times more effective than traditional glycoconjugate vaccines. Their work is published in the December 2011 issue of Nature Medicine.

A glycoconjugate vaccine is comprised of covalently bound carbohydrate and protein molecules, and is the standard design for many vaccines used to protect against common diseases such as pneumonia and meningitis.

Researchers designed the vaccine prototype after discovering that immune cells, called T-cells, can recognize a vaccine’s carbohydrates, and from that recognition elicit an immune response. This discovery challenges popular assumptions that immune cells only recognize the protein portion of glycoconjugate vaccines.

Proof that T-cells recognize carbohydrates came when researchers immunized mice with different types of glycoconjugate vaccines against the bacteria, group B Streptococcus. One group was immunized with vaccines containing different proteins. Another group was immunized with vaccines with the same proteins. For both groups, the carbohydrate chain in the vaccines was the same.

Researchers saw that mice given the vaccines with different proteins had just as good an immune response as those given vaccines with the same proteinsthe variability in proteins did not change immune response. This told researchers that T-cells were recognizing carbohydrates to generate a consistent immune response. They further investigated the mechanisms responsible for how carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugate vaccines activate protective immunity to a bacterial infection.

“One thing that is tremendously novel here is that we were able to find T-cells within a mouse after immunization with a glycoconjugate [vaccine] that just recognized carbohydrates,” said Dennis L. Kasper, MD, director of BWH’s Channing Laboratory. “So these may be the first true carbohydrate-specific T-cells found.”

The understanding that it was not only proteins, but also carbohydrates that were being recognized by cells led researchers to design a vaccine that yielded many carbohydrate particles when processed by the immune systemin turn creating a vaccine that generated a stronger immune response. Researchers believe that the more effective vaccine prototype they designed may one day assist in protecting high-risk populations susceptible of disease.

“For example, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are good in children, but are not effective in protecting the elderly,” explained Kasper. So we are hopeful that by designing vaccines like this, you’ll make better vaccines that will be effective in all the at-risk populations.”

Fikri Avci, PhD, lead study author and instructor in the Department of Medicine at BWH and Harvard Medical School adds that the findings on how the body’s immune cells interact with carbohydrates will also lead to more effective vaccines in the future.

“Carbohydrates are among the most abundant and structurally diverse molecules in nature,” said Avci. “They are extremely important in many biological functions. A better understanding of carbohydrate interaction is crucial. We are hoping that our findings will provide a framework for production of new-generation therapeutics and preventive medicines not only against bacterial infections, but also for cancer and viral diseases.”

###

The research was supported by grants from the United States National Institutes of Health.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is a 793-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners HealthCare, an integrated health care delivery network. BWH is the home of the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center, the most advanced center of its kind. BWH is committed to excellence in patient care with expertise in virtually every specialty of medicine and surgery. The BWH medical preeminence dates back to 1832, and today that rich history in clinical care is coupled with its national leadership in quality improvement and patient safety initiatives and its dedication to educating and training the next generation of health care professionals. Through investigation and discovery conducted at its Biomedical Research Institute (BRI), www.brighamandwomens.org/research, BWH is an international leader in basic, clinical and translational research on human diseases, involving more than 900 physician-investigators and renowned biomedical scientists and faculty supported by more than $537 M in funding. BWH is also home to major landmark epidemiologic population studies, including the Nurses’ and Physicians’ Health Studies and the Women’s Health Initiative. For more information about BWH, please visit www.brighamandwomens.org.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ] [ | E-mail | Share Share ]

?

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-11/bawh-brd112811.php

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Sean 'Diddy' Combs/Justin Combs -- FilmMagicComposed by AccessHollywood.com

Diddy’s son is taking his talents to the football field.

Justin Combs, the hip-hop mogul’s son, is headed to UCLA on a full football scholarship, it was announced on Tuesday.

PLAY IT NOW: Sean Combs Makes Kelly Rowland His ?Empress?

“Today I am truly blessed and thankful to accept my scholarship and give my full commitment to UCLA. Playing division I football was a lifelong dream of mine, and through hard work I was able to achieve it,” Justin said in a statement to Access Hollywood. “I am a living testament that with a strong relationship with God, family, and hard work dreams do come true.”

And while son may not exactly be following in dad’s musical footsteps – Diddy could not be prouder of UCLA’s new athletic star.

VIEW THE PHOTOS: Do The Diddy! Hot Shots Of Sean Combs!

“As a parent, today is one of the proudest moments of my life. This is everything a father could want for his son, for him to excel at what he loves to do and is truly passionate about,” Diddy said in a statement released to Access. “Justin is a shining example of what hard work, determination and a strong mentality can achieve. I am honored to call him my son and am happy that he is fulfilling his dream.”

Justin, a 5’9″, 170 pound defensive back, had his choice of big time college programs to choose from – in addition to UCLA, he was also offered scholarships by the University of Illinois, the University of Virginia and the University of Wyoming.

The teen also boasted a 3.75 GPA in high school as a student at Iona Prep in New Rochelle, New York.

VIEW THE PHOTOS: Who Am I? The Celebrity Offspring Edition

While UCLA has at least one of its stars-to-be locked up, what the school doesn’t have is a football coach for next year – on Monday, the school announced it was cutting ties with head coach Rick Neuheisel, following a 50-0 loss to crosstown rivals USC.

Justin won’t be the first son of a hip-hop star to play sports for a school in the West Coast’s Pac-12 conference – Master P’s son Romeo Miller (aka Lil’ Romeo) was a member of the basketball team for the University of Southern California in 2008-2009.

VIEW THE PHOTOS: Game On! Sexy Male Athletes!

Copyright 2011 by NBC Universal, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source: http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/rss/entertainment/*http%3A//us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/external/omg_rss/rss_omg_en/news_diddys_son_headed_ucla_football_scholarship161935300/43745390/*http%3A//omg.yahoo.com/news/diddys-son-headed-ucla-football-scholarship-161935300.html

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[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 28-Nov-2011
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Contact: Marjorie Smith
marjoriesmith@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-7541
University of Texas at Austin

Event: 1 Semester Startup Demo Day at The University of Texas at Austin

When: Thursday, Dec. 1, 5-9 p.m., open to the public

Where: Red McCombs End Zone Club, Gate 16, Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium

Background: Twenty undergraduate student startups from The University of Texas at Austin will present five-minute investor pitches to the Austin entrepreneurial community Thursday, Dec. 1. The startups are part of 1 Semester Startup (1SS), a class at the university that supports undergraduates who are starting companies.

The event is open to the public and interested attendees should RSVP online.

1SS, which has 75 enrolled students, allows undergraduates to experience entrepreneurship first-hand while learning from some of the most successful entrepreneurs in Austin.

“The motto of The University of Texas at Austin is ‘What Starts Here Changes The World’ we are in the changes-the-world business of our university,” said Bob Metcalfe, one of the three instructors for 1SS and professor of innovation at the Cockrell School of Engineering. “We are focused on entrepreneurial, technological innovation at scale, in particular, startups.”

Students from across disciplines, including computer science, engineering and business, advanced their startup companies during 1SS and were assisted with a semester-long program of startup acceleration. Students had to find co-founders, develop an elevator pitch and talk to customers. They also heard from local entrepreneurs including: Michael Dell, founder of Dell Inc.; Jason Cohen, founder of WPEngine; Ash Maurya, founder of Spark59; and Frank Moss, former director of MIT’s Media Lab and former CEO of Tivoli System.

1SS is taught by Metcalfe, inventor of Ethernet, founder of 3Com and the Cockrell School’s Murchison Fellow of Free Enterprise, as well as Joshua Baer of Capital Factory and the Department of Computer Science, and Johnny Butler of IC2 and the McCombs School of Business.

Agenda: (subject to change)

5 p.m. Investor-startup reception
6 p.m. Introduction
6:15 p.m. 10 startup pitches
7:15 p.m. Half time
7:45 p.m. 10 more startup pitches
8:45 p.m. Investor-startup reception

###


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AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 28-Nov-2011
[ | E-mail | Share Share ]

Contact: Marjorie Smith
marjoriesmith@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-7541
University of Texas at Austin

Event: 1 Semester Startup Demo Day at The University of Texas at Austin

When: Thursday, Dec. 1, 5-9 p.m., open to the public

Where: Red McCombs End Zone Club, Gate 16, Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium

Background: Twenty undergraduate student startups from The University of Texas at Austin will present five-minute investor pitches to the Austin entrepreneurial community Thursday, Dec. 1. The startups are part of 1 Semester Startup (1SS), a class at the university that supports undergraduates who are starting companies.

The event is open to the public and interested attendees should RSVP online.

1SS, which has 75 enrolled students, allows undergraduates to experience entrepreneurship first-hand while learning from some of the most successful entrepreneurs in Austin.

“The motto of The University of Texas at Austin is ‘What Starts Here Changes The World’ we are in the changes-the-world business of our university,” said Bob Metcalfe, one of the three instructors for 1SS and professor of innovation at the Cockrell School of Engineering. “We are focused on entrepreneurial, technological innovation at scale, in particular, startups.”

Students from across disciplines, including computer science, engineering and business, advanced their startup companies during 1SS and were assisted with a semester-long program of startup acceleration. Students had to find co-founders, develop an elevator pitch and talk to customers. They also heard from local entrepreneurs including: Michael Dell, founder of Dell Inc.; Jason Cohen, founder of WPEngine; Ash Maurya, founder of Spark59; and Frank Moss, former director of MIT’s Media Lab and former CEO of Tivoli System.

1SS is taught by Metcalfe, inventor of Ethernet, founder of 3Com and the Cockrell School’s Murchison Fellow of Free Enterprise, as well as Joshua Baer of Capital Factory and the Department of Computer Science, and Johnny Butler of IC2 and the McCombs School of Business.

Agenda: (subject to change)

5 p.m. Investor-startup reception
6 p.m. Introduction
6:15 p.m. 10 startup pitches
7:15 p.m. Half time
7:45 p.m. 10 more startup pitches
8:45 p.m. Investor-startup reception

###


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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-11/uota-1ss112811.php

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Pinches of salt at the ready, folks. According to the latest speculation, Microsoft’s sequel to the Xbox 360 will actually be two models, a pared down set-top box for casual gamers and a heftier model for the hardcore. Either way, Xbox 720 / Xbox Loop’s getting paired up with a revised version of the magnificent Kinect hardware. The digital grapevine’s saying that Kinect 2 will be able to read your lips, track your fingers and sense the tone of your voice to determine if you’ve come over all angry. It can’t do that currently thanks to its USB cable, which can only transmit 16MB/s of data — limiting the camera’s resolution to 320 x 240 at 30fps. We don’t know what protocol the new sensor bar will use, but we do know that either USB 3.0 (which can transmit 400 MB/s) or Intel’s Thunderbolt (700MB/s) would remove such limitations. In related news, 2012′s Kinect for Windows is getting a shorter USB cable for better data integrity and a refocused image sensor that will switch to “near mode” to see objects 50cm away — which means a whole bunch of classic Kinects and Nyko Zooms are gonna wind up as a filling for a New Mexico landfill.

Rumor mill: next gen Xboxes + Kinect 2 to read lips, track fingers, make unicorns real originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 28 Nov 2011 13:23:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/11/28/rumor-mill-next-gen-xboxes-kinect-2-to-read-lips-track-finge/

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Source: http://video.msnbc.msn.com/cnbc/45483429/

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